FAQ

If you left a survey for burglars to fill out the next time they ransacked your home, how would they rate the experience?
How did you learn about us?Rumors about rural houses having little Security.Location: 5/10Location was alright. Around 500 meters to the nearest neighbor. But unfortunately an hour away from any sizable population (20,000 plus being a sizable population.)Transportation: 10/10Transportation was top notch. The owners of the property never lock their Minivan or Pick-up truck. The keys are always left in the vehicles. Both are moderately new and somewhat non-descriptive so a perfect getaway vehicle. Not only did they provide vehicles they also kept trailers in a easily accessible unlocked shed.Security: 9/10Security was lax. There is a gate but it isn’t locked. Doors aren’t locked unless the house is left unoccupied for more than 2 weeks. No cameras made it really easy. They did have a dog which made it a bit of a pain. He was easily disposed of as he was just a Labrador Retriever puppy. Owners are very light sleepers don’t rob if they’re around.Products: 10/10No place has better selection. The place had 3 DSLR cameras, 3 Workstation class desktops, 3 tablets, 4 drones, 6 Smartphones, 9 external monitors and 11 laptops. All of the items were of premium design and value (aka Apples or equivalent). The freezers and shelves were well stocked the rest of the property was much more appealing though.They also had a shop on the property with many tools ranging from mechanics to carpentry to fabrication. The tools were of medium quality. The shop also stored 2 ATV for added convenience. The shop wasn’t the jackpot though.The shed was the real treasure trove. This drive in shed held heavy equipment all with the keys in the ignition for easy accessibility. The average equipment’s value was around $100,000, with a combined value of around $1.5 Million. Unfortunately the heavy equipment is hard to transport and the market is too small to get away with it.The products all seemed gift wrapped for the taking. Everything was easy to find as it looked organized.Laws in the area: 10/10Owners aren’t allowed to use lethal force or even have a premeditated weapon for self defense. A robber in the area once accidentally locked himself into the garage place he was robbing. As the owners did not come home for a couple days he resorted to eating dog food. The end result was the owners were charged for negligence of the robber. Laws almost protect us. Owners are not supposed to attack us in any way or they may be charged.Would you recommend to your friends?If everybody is gone a resounding yes. Unfortunately that’s not very often as the house is occupied by Home-schooling kids, a Writer and the owner is a farmer who mostly works on property. Also if you intend to use brute force, bring a weapon. All the occupants are big. The average height is around 6 feet.BTW bring friends to help loot. It really requires a team of people to loot the place.
How can I have an opportunity to visit the home for the aged to observe? I am interested in becoming a caregiver.
Call, write or email almost any and you probably will be welcomed but it takes a lot more to become a paid caregiver. You will probably have to get your LVN or CNA license and that requires schooling/training. If you are in the U.S. check with your local employment agency as there are some grants available for training under some conditions (or at least were a few years ago).
How much time must pass before you move or rent out a property purchased with the “VA home loan” program?
A VA borrower isn't allowed to rent out the property because of the primary occupancy rule. VA loan rules require the borrower to certify they will use the property as their primary residence. VA loans cannot be used to purchase vacation homes or second residences, they also require that you occupy the property within 60 days of closing. Anything beyond 60 days is considered non owner occupied, the new VA loan can be called in and foreclosed upon.
What are some of the best ways to learn programming?
It's been my sole focus to answer this question for the last two years, and I think a lot of the resources mentioned here are great but I've noticed there are three strategies that successful students consistently use better than anyone else regardless of what resources they use:1. Focus on habits, not goals2. Learning alone is painful3. Build thingsNote: some of this is borrowed from my answer to another Quora question: How can I prepare for Bloc?1. Focus on habits, not goalsIt seems counterintuitive that you shouldn't focus on goals, but hear me out -- it's all about leverage. Anyone who works with me knows that I dweebishly reference the R'as Al Ghul scene in Batman Begins pretty much 3-4 times a day:Our investors at Bloc are getting tired of board meetings starting with Batman clips.R'as tells Bruce: "Rub your chest, your arms will take care of themselves."If you focus on building the habit of programming for 20-30 hours a week, you will reach your goal of being a web developer. If you focus on the goal of being a web developer in X months, you get nothing from that but stress and insecurity about how far along you are. Focus on the habit, not the goal. Rub your chest, your arms will take care of themselves.So here's what you should do right now: put 15 minutes a day on your calendar to spend time programming. Don't do more than 15, just focus on doing 15 minutes a day. If you can do it successfully with no excuses for a week, try bumping it up to 20 minutes a day. Don't try to overextend yourself by doing an hour a day right off the bat, this is going to be a 10,000 hour marathon so we're focusing on developing the habit right now. The number of minutes you put in isn't as important as you showing up each day.2. Learning alone is painfulWhen I was learning web development, the two biggest social components to my learning were having a mentor and belonging to a community.Having a mentorI worked at a small startup called merge.fm while in college. I learned more in the summer I spent working with one of their cofounders than I did in the entire previous year at my university. There's just something about working alongside an expert who knows more than you that really accelerates your learning, you're able to pick up on how they think and unveil what you don't know you don't know. There's a reason why mentorship used to be the de facto standard of learning a new trade, it's very effective.Belonging to a communityFor me, the two communities I belonged to were the Illini Entrepreneurship Network (a student organization at my university) and HackerNews (a large hacker/startup oriented online community).I didn't learn what objects and classes were from HackerNews, but I learned a different category of things. I learned that nobody likes Javascript. I learned that Rubyists are the hipsters of programming. I learned that Bret Taylor, Rich Hickey, and John Carmack are programming gods, and that software companies that are truly serious about coffee have kitchens that look like meth labs.In short, I learned how to talk shop. That turns out to be important when you're working with other developers, but it's also the thing that makes you feel like a developer.3. Build thingsIn the first year of learning web development, I built:A Digg Clone (from a Sitepoint book on Rails, I believe it's out of date now though)An E-Commerce App (from Agile Web Development with Rails 4)A GeekSquad-esque App (personal project)A Realtime, Online Classroom (personal project)A Foreign Language Flashcard App (class project)I think building real projects is important for many reasons, but the most important one to me is because it's fun. That's something that is tragically lost in classical education, but I think it's important enough to be on this list. Look for resources that show you how to build things, http://ruby.railstutorial.org/ is a good one.4. Be a cockroachI secretly added a 4th item for those of you who've stuck around to read this far down the page.Paul Graham once told the founders of Airbnb:"You guys won’t die, you’re like cockroaches."You'll probably want to quit learning how to code at some point. Like anything worthwhile, it's difficult and will make you feel stupid at times. This is why #1 on this list is so important -- stop worrying so much about whether you're making progress or how much longer it'll be until you feel like you've "made it." All you have to do is focus on showing up, for 10-30 hours a week. Be as mindless as a cockroach about everything else, and don't "die."I made the statement years ago which is often quoted that 80 percent of life is showing up. People used to always say to me that they wanted to write a play, they wanted to write a movie, they wanted to write a novel, and the couple of people that did it were 80 percent of the way to having something happen. All the other people struck out without ever getting that pack. They couldn’t do it, that’s why they don’t accomplish a thing, they don’t do the thing, so once you do it, if you actually write your film script, or write your novel, you are more than half way towards something good happening. So that I would say was say my biggest life lesson that has worked. All others have failed me.Woody Allen
How many have filled out an I-864 to sponsor an immigrant or opened their home to a refugee family?
It's an affidavit for support you can get it on line Homepage forms it's 10 pages. Get two or three or copy it in case you make a mistake.